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CITY DIARY: Robert Maxwell’s son Kevin fends off bankruptcy again

Escape: Robert Maxwell’s son Kevin has once again fended off bankruptcy

Robert Maxwell’s son Kevin has once again fended off bankruptcy after he and his brother Ian yesterday settled a High Court dispute with loan firm DCF.

Still barred from being a company director, Kevin, 57, cuts a more modest figure from when he occupied his father’s 11-bedroom Berkshire home, Moulsford Manor.

He was last heard living in a bijou Oxford property near ex-wife Pandora, who rents her spare room through accommodation website Airbnb.

Matthew Kirk, Vodafone’s decorous external affairs director (spin doctor to you or I), has celebrated his last days at the company by cashing in £574,000 worth of shares.

Kirk, 56, joined Vodafone in 2006 after 20 years in the diplomatic service. Doubtless he’s found the private sector more rewarding, filthy lucre-wise at least.

Pneumatic brassiere tycoon Michelle Mone, 45 – Lady Mone of Mayfair, saints preserve us – flings open the doors of her palatial £2million London flat to Luxury London magazine.

Amidst art works by Picasso, Dali and Chagall, the property boasts its own spa which she’s had blessed by a priest, explaining: ‘I’m quite religious and something just didn’t seem to click in the space.’

Aren’t we just blessed to have Lady M as part of the legislature?

Salary watch: City firm Akin Gump are paying its newly qualified lawyers, most of whom would barely be out of university, a whopping £140,000. That’s double what most rival firms offer.

It’s more than some City firms even pay their partners. It’s not as much as the BBC pay autocue readers, but that’s just silly money.

Goldman Sachs is revealed to have its own nursery inside its flamboyant Fleet Street offices.

The Goldman Sachs Children’s Centre, the only on-site facility of its kind in the Square Mile, looks after employees’ children aged between three months and 12 years old.

I can hear the building’s original proprietor, buccaneer press baron Lord Beaverbrook, quietly turning in his grave.